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Interview with Webu Sayadaw by Sayagyi U Chit Tin (Jan. 19, 1976)
All of you have created, each one of you, great paramis. That's why you are all here, coming from various countries, distant lands, far, far away from here. But because you have acquired sufficient paramis you all arrive here at the same time, simultaneously from different countries. And having reached here, you want to know the Doctrine. So you have heard the Doctrine. You have learned the Buddha’s advice. But you do not remain satisfied with just hearing the Doctrine and just remembering it. You want to practice it. So you strive energetically and begin to walk the path. You establish the necessary effort (viriya), and in time, you must surely enjoy the fruits of your effort. Even now you know, of course, don't you? You're getting results commensurate with your application and diligence.
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An interview with Bhikkhu Bodhi: Climbing to the Top of the Mountain by www.dharma.org
What do you make of the fact that Buddhism is becoming so popular in this country? It is not difficult to understand why Buddhism should appeal to Americans at this particular juncture of our history. Theistic religions have lost their hold on the minds of many educated Americans, and this has opened up a deep spiritual vacuum that needs to be filled. For many, materialistic values are profoundly unsatisfying, and Buddhism offers a spiritual teaching that fits the bill. It is rational, experiential, practical, and personally verifiable; it brings concrete benefits that can be realized in one’s own life; it propounds lofty ethics and an intellectually cogent philosophy. Also, less auspiciously, it has an exotic air that attracts those fascinated by the mystical and esoteric.
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An Interview with Joseph Goldstein : The Practice of Impermanence by Inquiring Mind, PO Box 9999, Berkelely CA 94709 (Fall 2000)
Could you briefly explain the three characteristics and their role in the Buddha's teaching?
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An Interview with Joseph Goldstein by By Amy Gross, Tricycle Magazine: The Buddhist Review (Summer 1999)
Joseph Goldstein grew up in his family's resort in the Catskill Mountains of New York and graduated from Columbia University, where he majored in philosophy. Courses in Spinoza and Eastern Religion sparked an interest in both metaphysics and spiritual inquiry. "I read the Bhagavad Gita, and the whole notion of non-attachment-of acting without attachment to the fruits of the action-just made sense to me." He went to Thailand with the Peace Corps in 1965, met teachers of vipassana meditation in the Theravada tradition, and spent most of the next eight years in Asia. In l975, he, along with Sharon Salzberg and Jack Kornfield, cofounded the Insight Meditation Society (IMS), in Barre, Massachusetts, one of the first vipassana residential retreat centers in the country. In 1989 he also helped establish the Barre Center for Buddhist Studies.The author of The Experience of Insight: A Simple and Direct Guide to Buddhist Meditation; Insight Meditation: The Practice of Freedom; and co-author of Seeking the Heart of Wisdom, Goldstein is now working on a new book, tentatively titled One Dharma. He is also involved in planning the Forest Refuge, a retreat center adjacent to IMS that will hold thirty to fifty people doing long-term intensive meditation practice-a next step, he says, for dharma practitioners in the West.
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Interview with Joseph Goldstein: by by Sally Clough and Guy Armstrong, Spirit Rock in January, 1996, in Nicasio, California
Spirit Rock: Joseph, we've noticed in your talks recently a real sense of urgency around practice and a strong sense of the passing of time. Where is that sense of urgency coming from? Joseph: I think it's probably coming from the fact that I'm getting older, and there's definitely a sense of some finite amount of time left in this life. So I'm feeling the inspiration to practice as much as I can while I have the opportunity. It feels to me like we're in such a privileged time in terms of the availability of the dharma and the availability of practice. We never know when conditions might change.
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An Interview with Joseph Goldstein: Empty Phenomena Rolling On by Helen Tworkov,in October 1993,Tricycle Magazine,in Barre.
This interview took place in Barre in October 1993, and was conducted for Tricycle Magazine by editor Helen Tworkov at IMS in October, 1993. Reprinted with permission of Tricycle Magazine.
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An interview with Ajahn Pasanno by Remembering our Goal
I think we have to really remember what our goal is - it's practising this Dhamma-Vinaya and trying to understand the teachings of the Buddha: how to apply them, so that there's a clear acknowledgement of the fact that there is suffering and there is the end to suffering and be able to experience liberation.
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A Forest Monk -an interview with Ajahn Brahmavamso by Rachael Kohn
Ajahn Brahmavamso: OK, what really made me take that step was a realisation that deep inside there was much more to life than just getting on in one’s career or in relationships. Perhaps one of the most moving experiences in my life was one of my first meditation retreats. I did get into a very deep state of meditation, which was so joyful, it was so much bliss. And that never left me, and I wanted to find out what exactly that meant and how it fits in to the scheme of things. So that degree of deep meditation was something which changed a lot of perspectives on the meaning of life. I wanted to explore those perspectives more, and that could only be done in monastic life.
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