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An interview with Myoshin Kelley : FINDING OUR PLACE by Insight Magazine Archives, Volume 15: Fall 2000
What was it like in Burma? It must have been difficult, in some ways. Seeing so many monks and nuns of all ages on the streets wherever I went left a special impression on me. I immediately noticed the diligence of the nuns and laywomen in Sayadaw U Janaka’s monastery, where I was to do my practice. There were many old and young women; often teams of mothers and daughters meditated side by side. I had never experienced this before—being in a country that was so supportive of practice. Both the wealthy and the poor showed such joy in offering meals to everyone in the monastery, so these teachings could be continued. This generosity of spirit provided the container for my practice and sustained me when things started to get harder. Things got very hard. My body started literally disappearing before my eyes. I lost a lot of weight, which happens to many foreigners in Asia with the change of diet. Although I had some intellectual understandings of the culture before I arrived in Burma, my Western framework of expecting and receiving relative equality as a woman got challenged. I started to notice and become reactive to the way women were treated.
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An Interview with Thanissaro Bhikkhu: A Question of Skill by Insight Magazine Archives, Volume 14: Spring 2000
Thanissaro Bhikkhu, also known more informally to many as Ajaan Geoff, is an American-born Theravada monk who has been the abbot of Metta Forest Monastery near San Diego, CA, since 1993. He teaches regularly at BCBS and throughout the US and has contributed significantly to the Dhamma Dana Publications project with his books Wings to Awakening, Mind Like Fire Unbound, and a new free-verse translation of the Dhammapada.
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An interview with Sharda Rogell: Seeing the Truth of Freedom by Insight Magazine Archives, Volume 13: Fall 1999
Sharda Rogell has been teaching retreats at IMS for more than ten years. After living in England for the last three years, she will soon be moving back to the US.
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Interview with Nina van Gorkom by Robert Kirkpatrick September 1999
When you write about the development of vipassana, you don’t speak about concentration methods or sitting practice. Vipassana, insight, is actually panna (wisdom) which has been developed to clearly understand realities as they are, as non-self. It is not some special practice, it is not sitting or breathing. If one wishes to induce calm by sitting one still wants to get something. There is subtle clinging which can pass unnoticed. The aim of vipassana is to have less ignorance of realities, including our defilements, even subtle ones. Therefore it can and should be developed in daily life; any object can be an object for mindfulness and understanding.
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Interview with Leigh Brasington by
Q: You are currently working on a computerized Tibetan dictionary/text-preservation [not translation] program that has given you an opportunity to live and practice in the midst of a Tibetan Buddhist tradition in Nepal. Do you find many resonant qualities between the different traditions as they are now being taught? A: Oh, yes! The differences are mostly of method and emphasis. The whole idea of studying ones mind and understanding that we are trapped by our grasping is the foundation everywhere in Buddhism. What varies are the methods for studying ones mind and what techniques are used to help one learn to quit grasping.
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An interview with Joseph Goldstein: To the Forest for Refuge by Andrew Olendzki (From Fall 1998 issue of Insight) September 1, 1998.
Joseph, after practicing in India for ten years and teaching in this country for more than twenty, you have recently returned from a well-earned teaching sabbatical, in which I understand you did quite a bit of personal meditation practice. Has anything emerged from this experience, in terms of greater clarity?
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An Interview with Kamala Masters and Steve Armstrong: Sharing A Vision Of Practice by Insight Magazine Archives, Volume 9: Fall 1997
Kamala Masters has been practicing insight meditation for two decades with Munindra-ji, Sayadaw U Pandita and others, and has been mentored in her native Hawaii by Steven Smith and Michele McDonald-Smith. She has been leading retreats at IMS and elsewhere with Steve Armstrong and others for several years. She and Steve make their home on Maui, where they are raising a daughter. Steve Armstrong first came to IMS in 1977, served on the staff for more than two years and on the IMS board of directors before seeking ordination as a Theravada monk in Burma. He spent five years as the bhikkhu Buddharakkhita, practicing meditation with U Pandita and studying Abhidhamma with U Zagara. Since returning to lay life in 1991, he has been leading vipassana/metta retreats at IMS and worldwide.
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An Interview with Ruth Denison: BOWING TO LIFE DEEPLY by Insight Magazine Archives, Volume 8: Spring 1997
Ruth Denison is the founder and resident teacher of Dhamma Dena Desert Vipassana Center in Joshua Tree, California. She is the first generation of women teachers of vipassana in the West, and has been teaching at Insight Meditation Society in Barre since its inception in 1976. Ruth shared her life story and thoughts with Insight's editors while teaching at IMS in the fall of 1996. .
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An Interview with Corrado Pensa: The Unifying Quality of Dharma by Insight Magazine Archives, Volume 6: Spring 1996
Corrado Pensa is the guiding teacher of the Association for Mindfulness Meditation in Rome and a professor of Eastern Philosophy at the University of Rome. He is a former psychotherapist, and each summer for many years, Corrado has joined Larry Rosenberg in leading the “old yogi“ retreat for experienced meditators at the Insight Meditation Society in Barre. He shares some of his thoughts with Insight’s editors.
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An interview with Bhante Henepola Gunaratana - Going Upstream by Tricyle Magazine
(Tricycle): Are there ways of encouraging a monastic life in modern times? (Bhante Gunaratana): To update the monastic tradition, people don't have to be totally cut off from their societies. Even in monastic lives, there are certain things that people can do in order to make it more lively. In early days, monastic life seems to have been very grueling, very dark. The monks sat under trees or in caves and meditated all the time. One of the accusations that we get here from some very strict monastics is that we are too relaxed. Not that we have lost sight of monasticism, but that we try to update it by making certain adjustments.
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