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Wednesday, 26th April 2017 10:05pm.
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The 5 Regrets Of The Dying by Bonnie Ware
For many years I worked in palliative care. My patients were those who had gone home to die. Some incredibly special times were shared. I was with them for the last three to twelve weeks of their lives. People grow a lot when they are faced with their own mortality. I learned never to underestimate someone’s capacity for growth. Some changes were phenomenal. Each experienced a variety of emotions, as expected, denial, fear, anger, remorse, more denial and eventually acceptance. Every single patient found their peace before they departed though, every one of them. When questioned about any regrets they had or anything they would do differently, common themes surfaced again and again. Here are the most common five:
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Engaged Buddhism: Venerable Bhikkhu Bodhi by Reverend Danny Fisher, on Jun 4, 2010, The Elephant Journal Interview.
To give an example: When the South Asian tsunami struck at the end of 2004, Bodhi Monastery, where I was living at the time, raised a sizeable sum of money to provide relief. I looked on Google at the lists of organizations doing relief work in Sri Lanka and Indonesia. Amidst many secular, Christian, Jewish, and Muslim organizations, I could find only two Buddhist organizations, and these had roots in Asian Buddhist countries. This struck me as disturbing. I had to ask myself, “We Buddhists always speak about loving-kindness and compassion. Do we regard these as merely beautiful states of mind, or can they also issue in action?” It was this experience, simmering in the back of my mind, that led me to write my essay for Buddhadharma, and the fruit was the birth of BGR.
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Mind, Matter and Nirvana in Mahayana and Theravada Buddhism by Prof. N. A. de S. Amaratunga, http://www.island.lk
In Buddhism, the mind is central to the subjects of both matter and nirvana. By the word mind we mean ‘citt’ which according to Theravada Buddhism has four components namely ‘vedana’, ‘sangna’, ‘sankara and ‘vingnana’. These components participate in ‘paticca samuppada’ (dependent co-origination) and they are also four of the five ‘skandas’ (aggregates) which constitute the human being.
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Technological and Political Progressivism in Historical Buddhist Thought by Kris Notaro, ieet.org, May 28, 2010
Buddhism is one of the largest and oldest religions in the world, having been founded in approximately 500 BCE and currently possessing the third largest number of adherents of any world belief system. Over time, the fields of quantum mechanics, existentialism, phenomenology, and physics have all found parallels between their own theories and the theories of Buddhist thinkers throughout history. In addition, many concepts in the field of therapy such as a focus on the present moment and the belief that much of the turmoil human beings face originates not from external stimuli but from our own anxieties and psychological baggage were written about again and again by both Siddhartha Gautama, the historical founder of Buddhism, and those who followed in his footsteps.
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BUDDHA’S TEACHING OF ANATTA by Ajahn Brahmavamso, Daily Mirror, May 28th, 2010
“All conditioned things are impermanent. All conditioned things are suffering. All dhammas (all things conditioned and unconditioned) are anatta”. These are the three basic factors of all existence. It is in order to penetrate these truths that we practice the Noble Eightfold Path.
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Buddhism and Abortion by Barbara O'Brien, About.com:Buddhism, September 2, 2008
Los Angeles, USA -- The U.S. has struggled with the issue of abortion for many years without coming to consensus. We need a fresh perspective, and I believe the Buddhist view of the abortion issue may provide one.
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Perfectly Rapt by Sati Saraniya
Thursday, December 20, 2007 Generosity contains the whole path – from precepts to liberating consciousness. But to mature and develop it well, we may have to confront charred memories and perceived injustices that stall and weaken our ability to be magnanimous. Ferreting out our intentions – whatever they are – enables us to see through, and try to forgive, the mind’s covert games or prolonged tantrums. We can then dislodge selfish and caustic attitudes, or entrenched feelings that divide us from others as well as from the riches of our own heart.
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Right Speech-Right Silence by Sati Saraniya
Tuesday, September 11, 2007 Feeling too appalled or confused, can I wait to speak when I have a better chance of being heard? Though I risk losing the opportunity, I must take care to strike a balance, neither undermining my commitment to Right Speech nor mowing down others with sanctimonious zeal; at the same time, refrain from inappropriate apology and retreat that only suppress my own truth.
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Continuation Of Buddha In Those Practising Dharma by Thich Nhat Hanh, 7 Sep 2007, 0042 hrs IST,
I would like to talk to you a little bit about the Buddha, about who he is. First, the Buddha is not a god, he is a human being like us. This is very important to know. The Buddha does not claim to be a god, a creator of the universe. He is a human being like us.
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Must a Buddhist be Vegetarian? by Charles R Martin
At the time Siddhartha was alive, a Buddhist monk was supposed to live on food freely given by others: this act of freely giving is called dana, and later on in the Theravada traditions, giving food was a way for a lay person to accumulate merit. As such, it was forbidden to pick and choose — if someone gave you brussels sprouts and beets, you ate brussels sprouts and beets. On the other hand, if someone gave you a leftover roast cow, you ate roast cow.
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